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Writer Wednesday: Jennifer Bohnet

Allergic to housework and gardening Jennifer rarely does either but she does enjoy having friends to lunch and also wandering around vide greniers (the French equivalent of flea markets) looking for a bargain or two. Her children currently live in fear of her turning into an ageing hippy and moving to Totnes, Devon.

1. Why did you want to become a writer?
I’ve always loved reading and scribbled my own stories in notebooks from a young age. It took a long time for me to realise I could actually be this thing called a writer. I eventually did a correspondence course and started writing and selling features and lifestyle pieces to various newspapers and magazines. Since living in France I’ve written and had published hundreds of short stories and I’ve just finished writing my tenth book.

2. What's the toughest part of the writing process for you?
Switching off the internet and actually getting down to writing. I try to be very strict with myself - write for an hour = 5 minutes on social media. I often fail and the process is reversed!

3. What's the most enjoyable part of writing?
When everything begins to flow and the characters come to life.

4. Out of all the amazing books out there, which book do you wish you had written and why?

Gosh that’s a hard question. I think it has to be one of Jill Mansell’s early books, Staying at Daisy’s. She is brilliant at weaving different characters and plots into one easy to read storyline - and we all know ‘easy reading’ is the result of difficult writing.

5. If you could only save one of your characters from fictional calamity, which would you pick and why?
I think Eliosa from You Had Me At Bonjour. She’s an older secondary character in that book who’d had some tough times but came through smiling in the end when she got another unexpected chance at love.

6. If you could spend the day with your favourite literary character (not from your books), who would you spend it with and what would you do?
I’m not sure I have a favourite literary character but I would love to be able to chat to F.Scott-Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway about the time they spent down on the Riviera. We’d have champagne and cake in the infamous Hotel de Provence in Juan-les-Pins and they’d tell me all about the parties and the scandals that happened there in the 1930s’ - the so called golden era down there.

7. What can we expect next from you?
My tenth book is with my publishers at the moment - I’m waiting with fingers crossed to hear if they like it. I’ve already started the next book. I’m also writing my 6th serial for The People’s Friend magazine.

8. Is there any particular writing advice you wish you'd been given at the start of your writing career? If so, what is it? If not, what advice would you give to someone starting out?
Dreams come true if you work at them. Also, never give up.

9. Tell us what a typical writing day involves for you.
I’m lucky in that I now write full time. So first thing, I switch the computer on, have a quick check to see if anything urgent or interesting has landed in my e-mail over night and then get breakfast while my husband walks the dog and lets the chickens out. I’m also lucky that my husband likes to cook and has virtually taken over the kitchen so that’s my time done in the kitchen for the day! If it’s a day at home I spend the morning working in my office and after a two hour lunch break (well I do live in France so...) A couple of hours in the office in the afternoon and then we take the dog for a longish walk. A lot of social media surfing also takes place - especially when I hit a block! Housework tends to get left until we have visitors.

10. Finally, what are you reading at the moment?
I’ve just finished The Teashop on the Corner by Milly Johnson - another writer who can write easy to read books with intricate plots. Recommended.

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One summer they’ll never forget…

Meet Sabine, desperately fighting to save her little kiosk from closure whilst turning down her friend Owen’s proposals, time and time again.

Cue Harriet, returning to Dartmouth after thirty years, haunted by the scandal that drove her away and shocked by a legacy that threatens her relationship with her journalist daughter.

Enter Rachel, the mysterious newcomer who has an unexpected chemistry with a local widower, and who sets in motion a chain of events she could never have predicted…

One thing’s for sure, as the autumn tide turns, there’ll be more than one secret laid bare!
Follow Jennifer on Twitter | Buy The Little Kiosk By The Sea on Amazon |
Like her on Facebook | Visit her website

Writer Wednesday: Daisy James

Daisy James is a Yorkshire girl transplanted to the north east of England. She loves writing stories with strong heroines and swift-flowing plotlines. When not scribbling away in her peppermint-and-green summerhouse (garden shed), she spends her time sifting flour and sprinkling sugar and edible glitter. Her husband and young son were willing samplers of her baking creations which were triple-tested for her debut novel, The Runaway Bridesmaid. She loves gossiping with friends over a glass of something pink and fizzy or indulging in a spot of afternoon tea – china plates and teacups are a must.

1. Why did you want to become a writer?
I have been scribbling stories since I was ten years old. I think that was when I realised that my dream was to become a writer. I wrote my first full length novel over twenty years ago, in long-hand, and it's still in a shoe box on the top of my wardrobe gathering dust. It was only whilst I was in New York celebrating a milestone birthday that I thought again about writing another story. Hurricane Sandy meant we were stranded there for six days and everything had shut down. So I grabbed a pen and an exercise book and started to write The Runaway Bridesmaid, which is set in Manhattan before switching to the Devon countryside. This time I made sure I typed it up and sent it out to agents and publishers.

2. What's the toughest part of the writing process for you?
It might sound strange but for me one of the toughest parts is coming up with the characters' names. It takes me days, sometimes weeks to come up with the perfect name. A person's name is so important, it's such an integral part of who they are and how we perceived them. It has to reflect their age, their personality, where they were born and be a perfect fit for the character I'm trying to create for the story.

3. What's the most enjoyable part of writing?
It has to be writing the first draft. I love getting to know the characters I've created as they struggle with the obstacles I've put in their way. Sometimes they surprise me!

4. Out of all the amazing books out there, which book do you wish you had written and why?
I love books written by people who have taken the amazing decision to change their lives by moving to another country. I enjoy reading about their trials of doing up a dilapidated barn or farm, as well as settling into the local community and learning the language. Some of my favourites are Driving Over Lemons by Chris Stewart (love that title), Snowball Oranges by Peter Kerr and of course A Year in Provence by Peter Mayle. I've just read Wild by Cheryl Strayed and loved it. I also thoroughly enjoyed the books written by Karen Wheeler - Tout Sweet: Hanging up my High Heels for a New Life in France.

5. If you could only save one of your characters from fictional calamity, which would you pick and why?
It would have to be Rosie Hamilton in The Runaway Bridesmaid. She was my first heroine. She overcame lots of obstacles to find her Happy Ever After. And I love her attempts at 'baking herself better' from the recipes in her aunt Bernice's journal.

6. If you could spend the day with your favourite literary character (not from your books), who would you spend it with and what would you do?
One of the things I do to relax is archery. So - I'd love to spend the day with Legolas from Lord Of The Rings.

7. What can we expect next from you?
I'm busy working on my fourth book at the moment. I've completed the first draft and now knee deep in edits. It's set in glorious Cornwall so I'm enjoying the research and the dreaming, not to mention the clotted cream teas I have to eat to get myself in the mood. I hope it will be out early Spring 2017. I've also got a story in my mind for book number five, but that's just at the planning stages.

8. Is there any particular writing advice you wish you'd been given at the start of your writing career? If so, what is it? If not, what advice would you give to someone starting out?
The best advice I received from writer friends when I was starting out was to just write. Put your fingers on the keyboard and write, write, write. It doesn't have to be perfect at the beginning - don't fret about punctuation or spelling errors. Just get the story down and then you can spend time editing. You can't edit an empty page.

9. Tell us what a typical writing day involves for you.
I still write in long hand. It's a habit I don't seem to be able to break. So I will scribble in the morning and then type up what I've written in the afternoon. When I'm writing a first draft, I try to aim for around 2,000 words a day, but it's not set in stone - great if I can do more! I have a peppermint-and-cream writer's retreat (garden shed) which I love to work in in the summer months.

10. Finally, what are you reading at the moment?
I'm reading Extra Virgin by Annie Hawes who moved from Shepherd's Bush to the north west of Italy to live in a tiny rustico in the hills. I also have her next book Ripe For The Picking ready for when I finish it.

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When life gives you lemons, make lemon-drizzle cupcakes…

Lucie thought that proposing to her boyfriend in Tiffany’s would be the best day of her life. Until he said no. In just a few seconds, her whole world is turned upside-down! And when she accidentally switches cocoa powder for chilli powder at work, she finds herself out of a job, too…

Baking has always made life better in the past, but can Lucie really bake her way to happiness? Starting her own company, selling cupcakes out of an old ice cream van might just be the second chance that Lucie needs!

Of course, she never expected to find love along the way…

Follow Daisy on Twitter | Buy When Only Cupcakes Will Do on Amazon |
Like her on Facebook

Writer Wednesday: Tracey Sinclair

Tracey Sinclair is a freelance writer and editor, as well as a published author. Her latest series is the Cassandra Bick/Dark Dates series, the most recent of which is Angel Falls. She is also the author of the romantic comedy The Bridesmaid Blues.

1. Why did you want to become a writer? 
I’ve written stories from a young age, so I’m not aware of when I decided to ‘be a writer’, really. It just was always something I did – then in my teens I started to think it would be nice to make some money from it!

2. What's the toughest part of the writing process for you? 
I think sometimes it’s just sitting down and writing when you feel you have so much else to do, or a project is a bit stalled. Once I’ve actually picked up the pen I’m fine, but getting to that stage can be tough.

3. What's the most enjoyable part of writing? 
I think when something just flows, or a difficult plot point falls into place, the feeling is unbeatable. And I love it when I get feedback from readers that something resonated with them, or they enjoyed it. I’m thrilled that people seem to really like the characters in the Dark Dates books – there’s something about creating characters people fall in love with that feels truly special. And when I wrote my rom com Bridesmaids Blues, I had a lot of women go ‘oh my god, that’s totally me!’ which is enormously satisfying.

4. Out of all the amazing books out there, which book do you wish you had written and why? 
Ooh, great question but tough to answer. Maybe Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller, because it’s just such a beautiful love story, or Geek Love by Katherine Dunn, for its sheer inventiveness and originality.

5. If you could only save one of your characters from fictional calamity, which would you pick and why?  
It would be Medea (and by extension, her fiancée Katie) in the Dark Dates series. I feel like their relationship gives a beating heart to the books – they’re the only long-term, settled couple in the series so far – plus I really hate the current ‘#buryyourgays’ trend in TV for killing off gay women as soon as they become happy, so I want my books to feature a content, loving lesbian couple who don’t die.

6. If you could spend the day with your favourite literary character (not from your books), who would you spend it with and what would you do? 
God, these are such great questions but so hard! I’d quite happily spend the day being seduced by Valmont from Dangerous Liaisons, as I think that would be quite the experience…

7. What can we expect next from you? 
I’m working on the next Dark Dates book, but also potentially have another romcom in the works, together with a handful of other projects.

8. Is there any particular writing advice you wish you'd been given at the start of your writing career? If so, what is it? If not, what advice would you give to someone starting out? 
Don’t wait for the perfect time to write, or you’ll never find it, and remember something imperfect and complete is better than something perfect that you never finish.

9. Tell us what a typical writing day involves for you. 
There’s no such thing, really: I work on so many projects for a range of different clients that my days vary enormously from one to the next. I might have to write a theatre review for a 9am deadline then finish some editing for a client or write a magazine article before I can turn to my novels, or I might have a full day to work on a book. But that suits me: I get bored quickly with routines, and though there are some stages in a book’s production where I need unbroken stints of time, I actually work quite well in the edges of the day, with time snatched between other things. It keeps me energised, otherwise I can waste hours staring at the page.

10. Finally, what are you reading at the moment? 
Amanda Palmer’s The Art of Asking, which has some fascinating thoughts about the artistic process and living as an artist, Dennis Lehane’s Live by Night, which is compelling but brutal. I just started Lindy West’s memoir Shrill. I always have a handful of books on the go at any one time.

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Luce knows she should be thrilled when Jenna asks her to be bridesmaid – after all, they’ve known each other since childhood and Jenna is the best friend any girl could have. But it’s hard to get excited about weddings when you’re terminally single and the best man is the boy who broke your heart: Jamie, the groom’s dashing and irresistible brother. How can she face the man who dumped her when she’s still so hopelessly in love? Then again, maybe this is the perfect opportunity – after all, where better to get back together than at a wedding?

So Luce has six months to figure out how to win back her ex, but she has plenty else on her plate – from an old friend returned to Newcastle with an announcement of her own, to a youthful colleague who may or may not have a crush on her and a mother who is acting very strangely indeed… and that’s all before a mysterious, handsome American walks into her life.

Sometimes being a bridesmaid isn’t all confetti and champagne…

Follow Tracey on Twitter | Buy The Bridesmaid Blues on Amazon |
Visit her website | Like her on Facebook

Writer Wednesday: Jo Hollywood

Jo Hollywood is a freelance copywriter, columnist on several Regional British newspapers and blogger with Huffington Post UK. She has published three non-fiction works aimed at parenting children on the Autistic spectrum, based upon her experiences as a mother of an autistic son. An Unextraotdinary Life, a paranormal romance story, is Jo's first published work of fiction.

Jo gained a BA(Hons) English Literature and Drama with Theatre Studies back in 1996 and also worked as a senior renal nurse for many years. Today Jo lives in Lancashire with her husband of 18 years and their two young sons. When she is not busy writing, she likes to take her boys to the local museums, cafes, cinema, the Lake District and lots of playgrounds. ​She also drinks a lot of coffee.

1. Why did you want to become a writer? 
I have been an avid reader ever since I was a little girl. I just love stories. My real passion for writing though probably began when I went to University to study English Literature. It was there that I began to write stories and to develop my creativity by putting pen to paper. As for the reason of why I wanted to become a writer, well, I suppose that I just love writing stories that will help people unwind and escape from those daily realities. Writing also helps me to unwind.

2. What's the toughest part of the writing process for you? 
The hardest part would be getting time to write. I am a busy mum of two young children, my youngest son is autistic. So I try to write in the evenings, but sometimes housework and just general life gets in the way. I do sometimes try to write in coffee shops and libraries, and I enjoy this aspect. I used to set myself a daily writing target, but I no longer do so. Instead I sit down and write every day. Some days I write more than others but that's okay. I am not the world's fastest writer.

3. What's the most enjoyable part of writing? 
That would be seeing your characters come to life. This can be a somewhat slow process, but as you write you slowly begin to fall in love with them, and I love that part. I also love the solitude of writing. It's usually just me with the laptop, pen and paper and a cup of coffee.

4. Out of all the amazing books out there, which book do you wish you had written and why? 
 That would have to be without a doubt, The Time Traveller's Wife by Audrey Niffenegger. I adore this book and it completely blew my mind the first time I read it. I read it every summer. It is just so very insightful about the human spirit and that true love really does exist.

5. If you could only save one of your characters from fictional calamity, which would you pick and why?
That's a tricky one as I love all of my characters. But if I had to choose, it would be Jack. I love Jack. If I could turn back time he would no longer be a ghost.

6. If you could spend the day with your favourite literary character (not from your books), who would you spend it with and what would you do? 
Oh there are just so many to choose from, but it would have to be Henry from The Time Traveller's Wife. I would be able to travel through time with him. Who knows the adventures that we would bet up to? It would also mean that I could meet Claire.

7. What can we expect next from you? 
I am currently writing my second novel, Coffee with Matt. This does not have a paranormal theme, but it is a love story. I am only in the beginning stages at the moment, so I am not sure where the characters will take me, but I am having so much fun writing it.

8. Is there any particular writing advice you wish you'd been given at the start of your writing career? If so, what is it? If not, what advice would you give to someone starting out? 
I really wish that I had been told that writing is a very slow process and that you need to take your time. I struggle with that concept. It is important that you take the pressure off and write for yourself, rather than for anyone else. I think that once you do that, you can enjoy your writing and be more productive.

9. Tell us what a typical writing day involves for you. 
Oh there really is no typical writing day for me, every day is so different depending if the children are home or what needs to be done in the house. I do write every day though, be it at home or while sat in a coffee shop.

10. Finally, what are you reading at the moment? 
I am reading two books at the moment. The last book in Justin Cronin's trilogy, The City of Mirrors and a beautiful book by Anita Brooker called Hotel du Lac.

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When Tess unexpectedly bumps into Jack one cold day in March, her world is quite literally turned upside down. Can she make a new life for herself with Jack, based on how happy they were in the past? Or does she need to make a new start and find love in the arms of her new work colleague, Rob? The path of true love never does run smoothly.

Meet Tess, a woman who is still in love with her husband, who died five years ago.

Meet Jack, the ghost, who wants to make Tess happy again.

Finally, there's Rob who wants to win Tess's heart.

Who will she choose?

Follow Jo on Twitter | Buy An Unextraordinary Life on Amazon Visit her blog

Found (Arielle Lockley series) - out today!


I'm thrilled that Found is out today, and that you can all finally find out how the series ends. Thanks to everyone who pre-ordered the book, and everyone who has ordered it, so far, today!

The tour kicked off today, and Found has already had its first 5* review! You can read the review in full over on Bookish Bits.

To celebrate Found's release, and all the stops on the tour - you can find out who's taking part here - a giveaway is running until the end of the month. Please do enter below for your chance to win either a paperback set of B-Side and Found, an Amazon voucher, or one of two necklaces from Vaux St.

You can also enter over on Goodreads for your chance to win a paperback copy of Found. (Two up for grabs.) Good luck, and enjoy the book! x

Writer Wednesday: Angela Marsons

Angela Marsons lives in the Black Country with her partner, their bouncy Labrador and a swearing parrot.

She first discovered her love of writing at Junior School when actual lessons came second to watching other people and quietly making up her own stories about them. Her report card invariably read "Angela would do well if she minded her own business as well as she minds other people's".

After years of writing relationship based stories (My Name Is and The Middle Child) Angela turned to Crime, fictionally speaking of course, and developed a character that refused to go away.

1. Why did you want to become a writer?
I loved reading as a child and was never as happy as when my head was in a book. The more I read the more I wanted to create the stories that took people on incredible, exciting journeys. I wanted to explore human emotions and motivations and would invent situations just so I could explore how I felt about them. I once pretended that my Dad had left us so that I could write down my innermost feelings. I was scribbling away in tears and he had only nipped over the pub.

2. What's the toughest part of the writing process for you?
Discipline. I love every part of the process, research, first draft, second draft, third draft, editing. I really do love every part of the process but really struggle with the discipline of staying off social media and getting involved in things that don’t concern me just because I’m nosey. I think my productivity would increase tenfold if I could just learn to mind my own business.

3. What's the most enjoyable part of writing?
For me the most enjoyable part of writing is beginning that first draft. There is nothing like fresh notebooks and pencils just waiting to be filled. I call the first draft ‘my sandpit’ and I allow myself to write whatever I want. There is no editor on my shoulder or critic standing behind me. I leave them in another room and just write. I don’t share this draft with anyone until it’s finished as for me it’s the most magical part of the whole journey and my one and only chance to bond properly with the story.

4. Out of all the amazing books out there, which book do you wish you had written and why?
I wish I had written Disclosure by Michael Crichton. It was a book that captivated me from the first page and I simply could not put it down. It is the only book that has ever caused me to call in sick for work. I was so entranced by his ability to constantly pose questions that I just had to have answered before I put the book down. I read it again with a more analytical eye just to find out how he had managed to ensnare me so brilliantly.

5. If you could only save one of your characters from fictional calamity, which would you pick and why?
It would have to be Kim Stone - the main character in my current crime series. There is still so much that I want to discover about her and the demons inside her and luckily for me she still seems to have a lot to say. 

6. If you could spend the day with your favourite literary character (not from your books), who would you spend it with and what would you do?
I would spend the day with Tony Hill from the Val McDermid novels. His character is just a little off kilter, a little strange and quite mysterious. I would just want to follow him around for a whole day with the option of asking him questions about profiling and psychology whenever I wanted to. It would probably be a MISERY type situation with me in the Kathy Bates role.

7. What can we expect next from you?
I am still working on the Kim Stone series. Book four - Play Dead - has just been published and I am currently working on book five. I am currently contracted to write 8 Kim books altogether.

8. Is there any particular writing advice you wish you'd been given at the start of your writing career? If so, what is it? If not, what advice would you give to someone starting out?
The advice I would give to anyone starting out is to always remember why you started writing in the first place. Once you begin to submit work it is easy to become embroiled in the ‘business’ of writing. Rejection is always personal and can wither the spirit. It is important to maintain that love of words and storytelling and the passion for wanting to connect with the reader.

9. Tell us what a typical writing day involves for you.
My ideal writing day begins early. My favourite time to write is first thing in the morning before the rest of the world wakes up. I love that intimacy and feeling as though I’m stealing time. I think this comes from writing around a full time job for many years. Normally around lunchtime I’ll catch up with the rest of the world and social media, have some lunch, walk the dog and do household tasks. Often I’ll grab another couple of hours late at night.

10. Finally, what are you reading at the moment? 
I’m about to start See How They Run by Tom Bale. I always have a book to reward myself with once I’ve sent a book off to my editor and this one is burning a hole in my kindle.

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The dead don’t tell secrets… unless you listen.

The girl’s smashed-in face stared unseeing up to the blue sky, soil spilling out of her mouth. A hundred flies hovered above the bloodied mess.

Westerley research facility is not for the faint-hearted. A ‘body farm’ investigating human decomposition, its inhabitants are corpses in various states of decay. But when Detective Kim Stone and her team discover the fresh body of a young woman, it seems a killer has discovered the perfect cover to bury their crime.

Then a second girl is attacked and left for dead, her body drugged and mouth filled with soil. It’s clear to Stone and the team that a serial killer is at work – but just how many bodies will they uncover? And who is next?

As local reporter, Tracy Frost, disappears, the stakes are raised. The past seems to hold the key to the killer’s secrets – but can Kim uncover the truth before a twisted, damaged mind claims another victim …?

Follow Angela on Twitter | Buy Play Dead on Amazon | 
 Visit her blog | Like her on Facebook

The month that was: July 2016

What happened:
I am being really low-key at the moment as I am saving my pennies for my upcoming holiday to Florida, though I did pick up some awesome bargains in the H&M sale and spend my ASOS A-LIST vouchers on some holiday bits and bobs. I especially love this jumpsuit from H&M - I have a feeling I'll be wearing it a lot!

Speaking of the holiday, we headed to Kent to plan what we're doing with Olly's sister and husband, though they are now not going so we need to replan our holiday. (We were also there for an 80th birthday, and we headed back to Kent later in the month for another family BBQ.)

I'm super excited about Mickey's Not-So-Scary Halloween Party, though we're no longer going to Busch Gardens so I can't feed the giraffes on the Serengeti Safari. We are now going to Miami, however, so it's swings and roundabouts. The one thing I'm not excited about are the alligators. They terrify me! If you've been to Florida, please do leave me your tips/favourite restaurants etc in the comments. I've already got my mouse ears ready to wear from my visit to Disneyland Paris earlier this year!

We actually had some very sunny weather in London in July. Hurrah! I made the most of topping up my Vitamin D tan by heading either to the park or the common near our house. I miss having a garden when it's hot and sunny, but luckily we live so close to two beautiful outdoor spaces. (Plus it gave me an excuse to go out and catch some Pokémon.)

I also headed to Hampton Court Palace to catch up with a friend (I blogged about visiting there in July 2013, here and here if you want any details about HCP or more photos), and Olly and I headed to Clissold Park for a leaving picnic. It was strange heading to Finsbury Park to walk to Clissold Park from there; we've not been there since we moved out of Stroud Green.

Finally, I did the last bits and pieces on Found; advanced review copies went out to those involved in the tour, and the book is available to buy next week! (You can pre-order it now, if you want to, and you can also head to Goodreads for your chance to win a paperback copy.) I'm so excited to share with you all the final Arielle book, and I hope you love how the series ends.

What I ate:
Not much! Well, obviously I ate my three meals a day, but I didn't cook anything worth sharing. I only ate out at Byron this month, followed by drinks on the river.

What I watched:
TV-wise, I'm still watching Pretty Little Liars - they should never have done another series - and we watched the first season of Billions, which I absolutely loved. We also watched The Last Man on the Moon documentary, which got me even more excited for the Kennedy Space Center. (Yes, that's something else I'm excited about doing in Florida!) We watched the first episode of Mr. Robot, and we are also watching... *coughs* the old Pokémon cartoon. Tee hee!

At the cinema we went to see Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie, Ghostbusters and Star Trek Beyond in 3D. Absolutely Fabulous was OK - it felt a little flat in places - but I liked Ghostbusters. I also loved the Ghostbusters take-over at Waterloo. How cool does Stay Puft look coming out of the floor! As for Star Trek Beyond, I never watched the TV shows, but the new movies are quite enjoyable.

Other films watched: Straight Outta Compton, The Lobster, Spectre, Thor and Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation, Burnt, Me, Earl and the Dying Girl and Interstellar. We gave up watching Paper Towns and Irrational Man.

What I read:
In July I read 20 books and I abandoned reading two books. My favourite reads of the month were Targeted by Kendra Elliot, The Girls by Lisa Jewell, The Husband's Secret by Liane Moriarty and After the Last Dance by Sarra Manning. And I, of course, got my copy of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. Woohoo!

How was your month? Have you been on your summer holiday yet? x

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